Armour Bikes Mad Ti Peg Review

Review: Effraim.
Photos: Effraim, Armour Bikes.

Normally I wouldn’t say a peg review was such a big deal for me to undertake, but for me having used a larger diameter peg for the majority of my riding career switching to a thinner diameter peg was a huge deal.
When I rode for OG I used a smaller peg, and I stopped using them.The reason why was, I would stop riding and I could still feel the peg walking down the road which escalated till limping after sessions, this problem persisted until I switched to a bigger peg.
For years I had put this problem down to the size of the peg, and your foot bending around peg and not sitting as firmly as it would on a larger diameter peg.
Like anything I test I like to give the product some time to test and give some honest feedback on. Last October I was riding at my indoor riding spot and Matti Hemmings came along for a session, we were discussing x-ft pivots and the length of my pegs, I noticed Matti ran slightly longer pegs.

I thought to my self this might be a benefit for me, and also I was looking to get back into back wheel riding and grabbing the peg would be more comfortable.
What I immediately liked about the Armour Bikes pegs was the option of ti or plastic ends for the pegs, and the simple design. Pegs don’t have to be complicated, and means if I drop the bike indoors it doesn’t mark the floor. My main concern sorted, Matti got in contact with the chaps from Armour Bikes and got me some of his “Mad Ti” signature pegs.
What I noticed immediately when I started riding, was the grip. The knurling is awesome, and pretty much a year on, the grip is exactly the same. Less of a ball ache than changing grippe numerous times during the hot summer. The length of pegs was perfect for all the xft pivots that I do and am learning.

So, did my problem with my foot come back?
No, and touch wood it hasn’t so far almost a year in, riding these Armour Bikes pegs….
I wanted to give the peg some time to give an honest review, and I couldn’t really be any happier. The plastic ends have held up well and the ti ends on the front are perfect. The ti ends are a tad grippier than plastic for pivots which I personally like.
I’m not really a weight freak, but the pegs are literally so light when they arrived in the post I was blown away with the fact it thought like nothing was in the package.
Matti is on the ball with feedback on the peg, and Dez Maarsen suggested some washers so you can adjust the length, some like smaller width, some riders a longer peg. And the new colour way has the class finish of an iPhone, the 2019 model features this upgrade. This peg seems pretty much bang on the money as far as pegs go, this one gets the thumbs up from me. Good work Armour and Matti. Available from flatland fuel, armour bikes and any other good stores across the globe.

For all of you interested in specs:

6061-T6 body;
Grade5 titanium cap;
112mm length;
38mm diameter;
185grams/pair weight;
14mm axle with 10mm adapter.
Optional 4mm extenders;
Optional nylon caps.

http://www.armourbikes.com
http://www.flatlandfuel.com

Review: The Infinitesimal Secrets of The Flatland Kings Book.

Text: Cory Stratychuck.

When the news broke there was a flatland book coming out, I instantly knew it was something I must read.
After getting the file, the first thing my eyes hit was the artwork not only in just the pictures but also within the words. It really encapsulates this book and you will soon find out why.

It starts out; “Big things come in infinitely small packages,”

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Review: Landscapes 2

Text: Effraim.

Like I said in my review of Landscapes 1 last year, DVD’s in the modern era are a sad rarity in our scene from my perspective, during the last two years you can count those on less than one hand. Dane Beardsley’s Same thing daily project and IGI’s travel video are all we have had. Stewart Munro from Australia stepped up to the plate with an ambitious project to collect and edit together rider sections from all the planet, when you think about that in the modern internet culture and free edits available everyday it almost seems like a thankless task.

Thankfully Stewart stuck to the task which being so far away from all the other riders is I can imagine a tough task to collate together. The downloadable video straight to your laptop is catching on in other sports such as Skateboarding, more recently massive companies such as Adidas are releasing their projects for a small fee online. Will it catch on to what is essentially a small flatland audience? Only time will tell…

Landscapes 2 starts with a nice intro describing verbally the feeling of flatland and what it’s all about “it is a mirror that shows each of us who we are”. There’s always a unwritten formula to making a DVD, banger section to start, middle and the all important who got the last section. Would this follow suit, 52 minutes long let’s get into this!

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New Heresy Frames, Bars, Pegs, Seats and more!

heresy_cadres-web-17

Sebastian Grubinger just sent in a nice heads up on all the new Heresy range that is now available. The Ascend Frames in different sizes, from 18″, 18.5″, 19″, 19.5″, 20″, 20.5″. Head over to their product page to check the frames and specs, also they have the new 108 peg, and Reign Pivotal seat, bars! Heresy run a dialled operation, check it!

http://heresybmx.com

igi Pegs Review by Percy Marshall

It was a nice surprise today to see an email in my inbox from Percy Marshall who kindly reviewed Dub’s new igi pegs without me even asking! Percy has some interesting observations on the peg, read on!

Review/Photos: Percy Marshall

My current pegs are just stumps and my foot no longer sticks to them or even lands on them during tricks, so I decided to get a new pair of pegs.

When I first set eyes on the Dublin pegs, I thought it was too good to be true! I mean JUST LOOK AT THEM! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

So I was hooked on the pegs and realized I needed a pair to replace my 2.75″ stumps that don’t do me no good, if even just for the sick looks.

Dub is a great bussinessman making these sick looking pegs; but what I didn’t realize was how much functionally they are!

I no longer have to hammer in my socket through the fresh debris of peg material covering my peg hole. Another advantage is the lack of extra tools required to remove the head for easy access during peg removal.

It’s a socket hole so you’re already using the tool in the first place. Also, the peg doesn’t get sharp ridges on it’s head. I’m no longer finding bits of skin and blood on my peg ends, only the supple smooth rounded mushroom that is a pleasure to grab and functional to hold.

My firsts discovery was that their still pretty light even though there’s a hunk of material (aluminum) on the end of each; I worried about weight being excess because of this design, but that was put to rest when I held them.

The grip tape is fine but I probably don’t need it so it’s ok if it comes off naturally, but I may take it off; I like my peg shaft smooth as butter for foot pivoting and this supple old-man-grey grip tape gives me the heeby jeebees.

The other thing is the nifty little lip I keep finding my hands on. Even without the peg head attached, there is a nice little lip on the outer end of the peg. These details are amazing! TOTALLY SICK!

The heads are reverse threaded so they don’t accidently spin off your peg when you’re taking the head off.

Of course the best part by far is that the peg looks like family jewels!

Thank you brother!

Percy Marshall

Review: Baco Push it to 11

Review: Effraim.

I feel it is hard to put into words the influence the Baco crew have had on the BMX world, and especially the flatland world. Pre internet days where print and videos such as the Baco and Dorkin’ series were essentially like bibles for every flatlanders, for tis reason footage remained golden until its dropped in your VCR.

The most immediate that comes to my mind, In the modern day you can see the influence Chad Degroot’s riding in the Baco videos inspired a number of generations in the japanese scene. Especially back wheel riding!

But the influence goes way beyond that, how people dressed, the music people listened to, and of course the tricks people learnt. The thing about Baco that stood out to most might be the most simple thing, the whole crew had FUN on their bikes. And more importantly were themselves on their bikes, all too often in the modern era you can see riders trying to be something they are not. So many characters throughout the whole movie. This huge part of BMX seems to have crawled underneath a rock, maybe this is the video to bring that out!

As much as things change in BMX, the fundamental stays the same. The message to me was clear as I started watching Baco Push it to 11, all the memories came flooding back. The bottles being thrown off the bridge, Chad lacing killer combos in girls dresses, was Mark Hilson gay? Dylan’s crazy back wheel pedal combos, and possibly my favourite Dylan Worsley clip, when he is in a caboose and knocks crisps out of his hands with his bars as he rides out. The riding because the crew had so much fun, brought their own flavour hasn’t really dated at all, which is testament to what the Baco crew achieved.

Another big factor that is often overlooked, BMX! It’s all here, and flatland can mix with park, street, dirt, vert, it’s all towards the same goal of having fun. The great thing about the Blu Ray disc, is the amount of footage that can be loaded on it, the extra section is absolutely amazing. I have still yet to find the hidden video, I’m guessing it’s Baco Uncut?

Baco Push it to 11 is an absolute Must Watch! And one for the collector, I know I will watch this back in years to come, laugh and smile.

Thank you Baco!

Get yours! http://bacodesigns.com

Review: Moto Bicycles Pedal

Review: Effraim.

Like you reading this review, I was curious about the Moto Bicycles pedal. Made out of wood? Totally flat? Grip tape, would the wood last? What would a totally flat pedal feel like? Up until now, interms of a flatland pedal, I don’t think a great deal of thought has been put into the design, certainly in terms of thinking outside the box.

Ali B over at Moto Bicycles asked me if I would like to review the pedal, of course due to my curiosity I was down to test the pedal. Like everything I test, I wanted to give it a few months so I could write as accurate review as possible for you the rider reading Flatmatters.

So I am the first to admit I was sceptical over the design, my first impressions were good when the pedals arrived, the packaging and attention to detail to begin with were way and beyond what I have seen from a pedal before, even down to small details like having the allen key with the pedal + spare grip tape. Sometimes the little things make such a big difference. Not to mention the weight of the pedal, 150g for a pair.

I used an Odyssey pedal before using the Moto pedal, right away the feeling on the pedals was like being on a skateboard but on your bike obviously. Due to the grip tape, moving around and adjusting your foot on pedal was easier and what I didn’t consider at all, was safety and trick options opening up. The pedal is the flattest pedal on the market, at a total profile of 15mm. You can lean on the pedal and not cut your leg open, plus it opened up moves I haven’t done for years as well. (two footed dump truck ala Pete Brandt springs to mind immediately) as well as thinking of new ideas that I could do using the leaning on pedal/shin trick concept.

I am three months into testing the pedal, and so far the wood has held up perfectly (see photos above). I am still on my first sheet of grip tape, honestly right now couldn’t be more happier with the performance of the pedal. The design of the pedal like everything designed and made in Germany is genius and so stylish and even more so now they are available in colours as well, and like all things simple it makes me wonder how has this not been done before. I guess from a consumer standout it’s only negative is the price, if Ali and Moto Bicycles can find a way to cut the price down (maybe a plastic pedal?) this will be universally on every riders flatland bikes.

Contact: http://www.motobicycles.com/home-en.html

Review: Aggro Rag Freestyle Mag! Plywood Hoods Zines ’84-’89: The Complete Collection by Mike Daily

Review: Effraim.

Aggro Rag Freestyle Mag! Plywood Hoods Zines ’84-’89: The Complete Collection by Mike Daily

Aggro Rag Freestyle Mag! Plywood Hoods Zines 84-89: The Complete Collection contains all 1-12 issues of what in my opinion was and is the holy grail of the ‘zine era. For those of you not familar with ‘zines, they were largely put together with a typewriter, a xerox machine, hand writing, drawings and whatever your imagination could think up–countless hours spent cutting and pasting pre-Apple computers. In a lot of ways I think the ‘zine era had a lot more personality than any magazine or website could ever give you.

Flatmatters would probably not here without Aggro Rag, which inspired me to start my own ‘zine (Totally Intense) during my younger years. It was my childhood dream to get hold of an issue of Aggro Rag. When the book arrived on my 39th birthday last week, I felt like my collection was complete. My overwhelming thought writing this review, is that you really cannot put a price on what this book is worth. But at $24.43 this book is a steal of a deal!
The book is no holds barred, 443 pages of history! A historical archive of one of the most influential crews to ever leave their mark on BMX, the Plywood Hoods, and of course the most influential flatlander of all time, Kevin Jones.

The book opens with some great Foreword/Intro writing by Andy Jenkins and Mark Lewman, both of Freestylin’ magazine fame. Andy recalls the first time he met Mike Daily at an AFA contest in New York in 1986, and Lew writes about their meeting through US mail: “When Freestyle was new. The sport felt like it moved so fast you could feel it shifting under your feet. Paradoxically, the information moved as slowly as the pace of a monthly magazine or an AFA contest; between these events, BMX kids were left to their own devices to fill in the gaps and write their own history… Along with with VHS sister media, Dorkin’ in York, A-rag became a national underground phenomenon and within 3 years it was the, uppercase italics, premier Xeroxed freestyle publication.”

Lewman’s intro is followed by Daily’s three-page new interview with Kevin Jones “about the cover”. Kevin recalls about the cover shot: “It’s a squeakerson, or whatever. Wheelchair walk, sittin’ on the handlebars. I don’t really remember what it would have been called.”, his first triple decade on the CW in the photo, his breakdance influences, riding with Skyway Tuffs and later going on to ride for Skyway, and collecting old bike parts. It is brilliant engaging stuff!

It is great to see the advances through the ‘zine as the issues developed, not only in riding, but design, editorial, content, xerox art, and graphics. A one-page intro leads into each issue.

If you are paying attention, you will notice that the number “43” appears throughout: in the publication date, the price, and so on, another Plywood Hoods touch to the book that adds personality to the project. You sense as much as the Hoods pioneered modern day flatland, none of this has gone to their heads: They had a blast. BMX was truly about having fun and expressing themselves whether through riding, Dorkin’ videos, ‘zines or any other creative outlet.


Photo credit: Jared Souney.

It would be a massive review if I were to list in detail everything that is contained within the book: countless editorials as you’d expect from 12 issues (Issue 3 contains words that ring true to this day, Society and its perception of us–if you have ever been kicked out of a car park, you will relate) and Issue 9 “Are you a contest zombie?”, brilliant insight into the Hoods way of thinking. Mike Daily writes about the differing attitudes they came across at an AFA Austin Texas contest they covered in the same issue. The Hoods were hanging out at the hotel with a bunch of “well-known freestyle personalities”, and Daily comments: “Instead of checking the tape out, though, the other guys in the room felt the need to cut down mostly every rider for one reason or another.” The Hoods didn’t say anything, Daily writs, and it wasn’t until later that night that they discovered that all three of them had simultaneously thought, “These guys are fake.”
Daily goes to comment about the mocking of Jason Parkes that had ensued. To bring context to this story without including the whole article, the Hoods were big fans of Jason Parkes, and I can totally appreciate why. One of the riders asks, “You LIKE that stuff?” to which Mark Eaton replies “YEAH!” confidently. It is golden, gripping stuff from the archives.

Daily goes on to talk about these kids that live just for the contests, and do their thing without a care in the world. He wraps the article up with: “What I am trying to say is, don’t expect every freestyler in the free world to have the same values you have. Not everyone rides simply to show superiority over others. By the same token, not everyone rides solely for personal pleasure either. Just don’t look down upon a fellow biker for what he stands for, or what he does in a contest, or how he freestyles. The bottom line is…just ride. There shouldn’t be anything else.”

Somewhere through my younger years putting together Totally Intense ‘zine, I coined the phrase “Ride first, read later” and I never knew where I got it from. As it turns out, I got it from Mike and Aggro Rag. And this attitude–to just ride your bike–shines through in every story in the book, time after time.

I’ve gone into detail about this editorial, and I thought it worthwhile as it shows the Hoods way of thinking. They were totally open to riding their bikes in all forms, whether at the lot, a ditch, a backyard ramp, whatever. There is something really pure about what they did, and probably still are doing today, just not all together, as they moved to different parts of the country. The legacy lives on.

Of course there is much more content besides: cartoons, and AFA/2-Hip contest reports. Throughout, the rivalry between Kevin Jones and Rick Moliterno comes up in AFA repos and even the Dizz Hicks interview in Issue 9, which I found interesting. It was something as a kid growing up reading Freestylin’ I never got a sense of, and later on in the three-part intro to Daily’s 16-page grand finale to the book, “Kevin Jones: The Man. The Interview.”

The Hoods document numerous how-to’s, skateboarding, a visit to the home of Freestylin’, (Torrance, CA), and skatepark sessions. In Issue 6, Mike Daily recalls: “The biggest perk [of being a ‘zine guy back in the mid- 80’s] for me was being asked to contribute to Freestylin’. That was the shit. As cool as it was to make your own ‘zine, getting something printed in Freestylin’ was infinitely cooler. Andy [Jenkins] requested permission to reprint an editorial I’d published in Aggro Rag. It was called ‘A Puppet No More’ and ran in an ‘Off the Deep End’ with a photo of my favourite rider, Ceppie Maes. I think it won a design award.”

At 443 pages, over time I pick up the book and I find something new that I had previously missed. One of my favourite things about this book is the amount of Interviews with groundbreaking and influential people/characters in BMX and flatland. It struck me that a lot like the Hoods riding, Mike Daily and the Hoods were interested in other riders that brought something fresh to the table. The list is extensive: Dale Mitzel, Jamie McKulik, Kenneth Evans, Mario Salas, Dave Pak, Gary Pollak (the inventor of Pinky Squeaks and Perverted Boomerangs), John Swarr, Craig Grasso (his infamous naked ramp run at the Enchanted Ramp in SD appears on the cover of Issue 11), John Huddleston, Ceppie Maes, Dizz Hicks, Jason Parkes, Aaron Dull (who did the caboose on the other coast of the US at the same time as Kevin), and Pete Augustin. Chris Day in Daily’s intro to Issue 11 gets asked how he felt about all the random “fidge sequences” in Dorkin’ 2. The list goes on: Jym Dellavalle, Dave Mirra (four-page new interview in Issue 12), Chris Moeller, Perry Mervar before he turned Pro, Marty Stoyer and…

Of course, the highlight for many: “Kevin Jones: The Man. The interview.” is so engaging. The most influential flatland rider of all time has largely remained mysterious, which only adds to the intrigue. Throughout the 443 pages of the book, when you read the Plywood Hoods’ attitude towards fame and contests, it becomes a clearer: You get the impression that Jones and the Hoods went and had fun every day, whether it was a ten-hour day riding at Mount Rose, or blasting a tabletop at the local skatepark. It was all about fun and the regular “fidge” moment.

As I already commented, there is a wonderful purity to what the Hoods achieved that might never be matched in this day and age of the Internet–riders of all levels who send in footage daily. I feel thankful that the Hoods took the time to document what they got up on their bikes in video form as well as in ‘zine format, and collated it together in this wonderful book. I have often wondered what flatland would have been like now without Kevin Jones and the Plywood Hoods.

The Book fittingly ends with the part I am sure, anyone who is interested in flatland will want to read. The Kevin Jones interview opens with a three-part intro which gives you eight pages of insight into Kevin’s background as a breakdancer and his early days on Skyway. Mike Daily writes about Kevin getting picked up by Skyway, and dropping a whole new realm of tricks at the AFA Masters in Austin, Texas, on May 2, 1987. Kevin dropped the trolley, the crank-a-roni, the elephant glide, and after his run had ended unfortunately, the locomotive. Lew at Freestylin’ reported: “Kevin Jones got the crowd louder during his run than anyone else the whole weekend, including the pros.”

Everyone, it seems–aside from Kevin–couldn’t believe that he got second place to Rick Moliterno. Kevin comments: ” I would have been satisfied if I’d have made the top ten, and then I got second. I didn’t know why there was all the controversy about it…[Rick] beating me. I was just glad to get second, plus I got sponsored. That’s all I wanted to do anyways was get sponsored. I never early cared about getting first.”

The intro goes back to Kevin’s younger years to document his first competition at the AFA Masters in Long Island, New York, in September 1986. Kevin was already making personal modifications to his CW, such as the homemade locking lever, and bringing new tricks to the table. He dropped a handstand-type boomerang which immediately earned him a lot of respect (Rick Moliterno even commented: “The man don’t joke about boomerangs.” Kevin managed to tie with CW’s Greg Kove “with a completely blown run,” Daily reports.

Mike Daily goes onto the write about Kevin’s contest achievements, and also the Hoods’ first hearing about Tim Treacy doing a scuffing trick call the backyard. Once Kevin had worked out what the technique involved, he went about developing his first scuffing move, the locomotive, whilst holding the beam in his parents’ garage. He planned to drop it as his last trick in Austin, Texas. Around this time, both Kevin and Aaron were inventing the same tricks on the east and west coasts of the country: the trolley or the puppet, the caboose or the stick bitch.

I could go on and on, as I am mesmerised by the text. It’s fascinating stuff. Daily discusses the post-Skyway era with Kevin’s time on GT, his contract with GT being terminated (this is a bit I will leave for you to find out about!), AM riders being inspired by Kevin, and so on. I don’t want to reel off the whole book.

The new Kevin Jones interview–with quotes by various friends and fans–addresses the origin of scuffing, the best basketball sneakers of the 80’s/90’s, trick names, what Kevin feels about modern day flat, why he waited so long to turn pro, what bike frames he designed, family life, having kids, his dream job and why he stopped making up new tricks. There is a great part where they talk about the Hang 5, and the impact it’s had on street riding in the modern day.

It’s a fitting end to a beautiful piece of flatland and BMX history that I will hold dear to myself forever.

This book is a must-have if you are into flatland and BMX riding–whether you’re old school, new school, mid school. Whatever label you care to put on it, going to school will get you an education, help you learn about the sport, and learn about these influential riders that have shaped what we do and love today. And now after 20 or so years wondering, I now know what the art of “fidging” is.

The book is $24.43, an absolute steal!!! Go preorder this right now direct from Mike Daily on http://aggrorag.com Mike is offering signed copies + t-shirts and hoodies package deals until 11:59pm PST on Wednesday, March 13th, and is expecting to ship all preorders worldwide from Oregon before the book’s official release date of April 3, 2013 (4.3.13). It will be something you will look back on for years to come.

Thank you Mike Daily, and thank you to Kevin Jones and the Plywood Hoods for making flatland and BMX what is today!

Related posts:

Well worth checking out this special episode of FlatWebTV that dropped last week!